Explore Aging by the Numbers

 

The world population is aging rapidly, but nowhere will that impact be felt as strongly as Asia 

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Scroll down to explore the story of aging in Asia. Many of the images below are interactive, so hover or click to get more detailed data. While this page can be viewed on mobile devices, it is optimized for viewing on laptops or tablet devices.

 

+ How to Use This Map

  • Choose the year by sliding the circle or using the arrows. See country information by moving your cursor over the map or by clicking on individual countries. To change from single-country view to full view, click on any non-colored element of the map (e.g., the ocean). On desktop, hold down shift key and grab the map with your cursor to move the map.

  • When using the toolbar at the top left of the map, the +/- buttons allow you to zoom in and out; the home button restores the original size and placement of the map if you have made changes; the remaining tools allow you to select groups of countries.

+ References and Notes

  • Data are from the United Nations DESA/Population Division’s World Population Prospects, 2017 Revision, and the regional breakdowns of that data follow the UN definitions. In all UN data on this site, values for 1950–2015 are estimates and those thereafter are projections (medium variant).

  • For information on the definitions of the stages of aging, see Kinsella and Wan He (2009); UN (2017) and IPSS (2017).

  • You may share individual data visualizations by using the share icon at the bottom of each map or chart, where available.

  • Questions or suggestions? Please email ahwin@jcie.or.jp.


Learn more about aging in: China | Indonesia | Philippines | Republic of Korea | Vietnam | More data & countries to come…


The proportion of Asia’s population 65 years and up is rising quickly, but it hasn’t caught up to Europe or North America yet.

 

+ How to Use This Graph

  • Click on a line on the graph or an entry in the legend to isolate a single region. Click anywhere on the background of the graph to return to the original view.
  • You may share or download individual data visualizations by using the share icon at the bottom of each map or chart.

+ References and Notes

  • Regional breakdowns of data follow the UN definitions. In all UN data on this site, values for 1950–2015 are estimates and those thereafter are projections (medium variant).
  • Questions or suggestions? Please email ahwin@jcie.or.jp.
 

But the increase in terms of numbers will be enormous. East and Southeast Asia alone are expected to have 557 million seniors aged 65 or over by 2050—that is nearly double today’s number.

 

+ How to Use This Graph

  • Click on a section on the graph or an entry in the legend to isolate a single region. Click anywhere on the background of the graph to return to the original view.
  • You may share or download individual data visualizations by using the share icon at the bottom of each map or chart.

+ References and Notes

  • Regional breakdowns of data follow the UN definitions. In all UN data on this site, values for 1950–2015 are estimates and those thereafter are projections (medium variant).
  • Questions or suggestions? Please email ahwin@jcie.or.jp.
 
 

Asian countries are aging at different rates, but some will undergo that change with unprecedented speed

 

Countries in the West underwent a long, gradual shift from “aging” to “aged” societies, but countries in Asia will make that shift in a fraction of the time.

speed-aging.jpg
 
 

 
 
 
 

+ NOTES

  • The United Nations population data is recorded as of July 1 of each year. Accordingly, if a country reached a threshold ratio (e.g., 7%) in the latter half of a given year, it would not register in this chart until the following year and thus may not correspond precisely to individual countries' data. (For further information, visit the United Nations World Population Prospects site.)
  • You may share or download individual data visualizations by using the share icon at the bottom of each map or chart.
 

As the senior population grows, so will demand for long-term care and medical treatment

 

Luckily, life expectancy is rising, but on average, a person over the age of 60 will spend 4–6 years of their remaining life dealing with disabilities.

 
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For example, the number of people with dementia in Asia is expected to triple by 2050.

Suggested citation: AHWIN, “Data on Aging,” www.ahwin.org/data-on-aging; compiled based on  Alzheimer’s Disease International  (2015).

Suggested citation: AHWIN, “Data on Aging,” www.ahwin.org/data-on-aging; compiled based on Alzheimer’s Disease International (2015).

In many Asian countries, there will be fewer working-age people to bear the rising financial and caregiving burdens.

 

In China, for example, in 2000 there were roughly 10 working-age adults for every 1 senior, but by 2050, that number will drop to just 2.
The chart below shows the changes in this “support ratio” occurring in a number of Asian countries.

China_Dependency-3.jpg
 
 

 
 

+ How to Use This Graph

  • Click on a line or an entry in the legend to isolate a single region. Click anywhere on the background of the graph to return to the original view.
  • You may share or download individual data visualizations by using the share icon at the bottom of each map or chart.

+ References and Notes

  • In all UN data on this site, values for 1950–2015 are estimates and those thereafter are projections (medium variant).
  • Questions or suggestions? Please email ahwin@jcie.or.jp.
 

AHWIN is supporting collaborative initiatives to help Asia develop and share data, policies, and innovations to cope with these coming changes.